ICAO releases Corrigendum #1 for the 2015 – 2016 edition; addresses the carriage of Lithium Metal Batteries aboard passenger aircraft

On December 10th, 2014, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) issued an Electronic Bulletin (EB 2014/72) which announced the release of Corrigendum #1 (itself dated November 20th, 2014) to their 2015 – 2016 edition of the Technical Instructions for the Safe Handling of Dangerous Goods, commonly referred to in the industry as the ICAO TI.  The ICAO TI serves as either the actual regulation governing or as the most common basis for most other regulatory texts addressing the carriage of dangerous goods by air around the world. The corrigendum is brief (only one item) and addresses the issue of the ability of a state to grant an exemption from the prohibition of the carriage of Lithium Metal Batteries aboard passenger aircraft.  (Reference ICAO TI 1;1.1.3)  This is stated in a revised version of Special Provision A201, and is presented verbatim below:


TECHNICAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SAFE TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS BY AIR
In Part 3, Chapter 3, page 3-3-3, Special Provision A201, amend to read:
A201 States concerned may grant an exemption from the prohibition to transport lithium metal batteries on passenger aircraft in accordance with Part 1;1.1.3. Authorities issuing exemptions in accordance with this special provision must provide a copy to the Chief of the Cargo Safety Section within three months via email at CSS@icao.int, via facsimile at +1 514-954-6077 or via post to the following address:
Chief, Cargo Safety Section
International Civil Aviation Organization
999 University Street
Montréal, Quebec
CANADA H3C 5H7

Lithium Metal (i.e. “primary” or non-rechargeable) Batteries are considered to present a more severe risk of hazard than Lithium Ion (i.e. rechargeable) batteries due to their higher Lithium content, and under normal circumstances they are banned from carriage aboard passenger aircraft.  They are however normally allowed aboard cargo aircraft.  ICAO estimates that this new exemption, which was created to address potential emergency requirements for the transport of such batteries, will be invoked only rarely due to the ready availability of cargo aircraft to carry such goods under most circumstances.

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The Changing Regulations Pertaining to the Transportation of Lithium Batteries

In August of 2014 the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) promulgated final rule HM-224F affecting the safe transport of lithium batteries[i].  DOT announced that the resultant effects from the revisions of HM-224F will “strengthen safety conditions for the shipment of lithium cells and batteries. These changes, some of which focus specifically on shipments by air, will better ensure that lithium cells and batteries are able to withstand normal transportation conditions and are packaged to reduce the possibility of damage that could lead to an unsafe situation[ii].” Continue reading

‘Why do I need a new Air Regs book every year?’

I’m often asked:   why do I need a new Air Regs book every year?  Always an interesting question and the answer changes every year!   For 2015 though, it’s really simple. This is an ICAO year, one in which there’s  a new edition of the ICAO Technical Instructions which is worldwide legal requirements for transporting dangerous goods by air. When the FAA or DOT comes to do an inspection, something they can do at any time without forewarning, they will want to see that your documentation and operations are current with the latest legal requirements (i.e., the 2015 – 2016 TIs). Continue reading

USDOT/FRA Issues Final Rule Mandating Improved Employee Training for Railroads, Contractors, Related Groups

The FRA’s new regulation mandating improvements to safety related training in the rail industry applies across a wide scope of operations, including not only large and small railroads and related contractors but also to tourist rail operations running on the national system, like this preserved Nickel Plate Road steam locomotive owned by the Fort Wayne Historical Society and operating over Norfolk Southern rails at Tolono, Illinois in 2011. (©9/2011 by Paul Burgess, used with permission)

The FRA’s new regulation mandating improvements to safety related training in the rail industry applies across a wide scope of operations, including not only large and small railroads and related contractors but also to tourist rail operations running on the national system, like this preserved Nickel Plate Road steam locomotive owned by the Fort Wayne Historical Society and operating over Norfolk Southern rails at Tolono, Illinois in 2011. (©9/2011 by Paul Burgess, used with permission)

On Friday, November 7th, 2014, the United States Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) issued a final rule mandating significant improvements to the way training and the documentation of training for both railroad employees and the employees of railroad industry contractors (i.e. track and infrastructure construction maintenance and other activities related to actual operations) is structured and conducted.  The new rule is notable for its broad scope and application across a range of industry participants, as well as the detailed requirements it sets forth for affected parties. Continue reading

Infographic | What exactly are Dangerous Goods?

Beyond explosives, corrosives and other flammable or radioactive materials, the Dangerous Goods classification encompasses a surprising array of everyday items. This infographic takes a look at some of the things people might be surprised to learn are regulated when it comes to shipping.

DangerousGoods_Infographic_Labelmaster_540 Contact Labelmaster today to learn more about these and other important DG topics.