Tag Archives: Air Shipments

Geoff Leach on hazmat training, compliance and the Dangerous Goods Symposium

Geoff Leach on hazmat training, compliance and the Dangerous Goods Symposium

Longtime Dangerous Goods veteran Geoff Leach will participate in the Technology & Training workshop during the 12th annual Dangerous Goods Symposium, September 6–8, 2017, in Chicago. “I get very cross when people say Dangerous Goods is dull,” says Geoff Leach, founder and director of The Dangerous Goods Office, Ltd. “How can any subject be dull

Living the DG Life

New video explores Dangerous Goods compliance at 30,000 feet

Mike Wentz is Manager of Cargo Compliance for American Airlines, but when he talks about his job he could be speaking for any Dangerous Goods professional in any capacity: “I knew I’d never be comfortable in the role unless I could understand the regulations back to front and be able to communicate them effectively.” Get

Which of your employees needs hazmat training?

Q: Our company ships hazardous materials. How do we identify which employees actually need hazmat training? It’s vital that you make informed decisions as to which members of your team need training. Because non-existent or insufficient training is one of the most common violations cited by enforcement agencies, you need to ensure your company maintains

DG Digest: More Lithium Battery News, PHMSA Special Permits and FRA Fines Hit Record Heights

Several items of note occurred in the DG world last week, with new and revised regulations affecting everything from Limited Quantities to Lithium Batteries and a vital Federal Agency noting that its enforcement penalties were way up: ICAO/IATA Lithium Battery Rules Changes Both the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Air Transport Association

IATA DGR Update: Everything you know about lithium battery shipping may change

Shippers are still coming to grips with the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) addendum, which among other changes, established the first-ever state-of-charge limitation on air transport of lithium batteries. Then, on Saturday, January 16th, the International Air transport Association (IATA) released an addendum to 57th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations, commonly referred to as

ICAO proposing even more changes to lithium battery rules for air shipment

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) held its semi-annual meeting in Montreal, Canada earlier this month. Among many issues discussed there were further changes that may affect shippers and carriers of lithium batteries. This commodity has been under the spotlight for several years now on account of the sometimes-volatile transport incidents that have come to

The Latest Developments in International DG Regulations

It’s been an incredibly busy last six weeks in the realm of international regulatory development. The beginning of November saw the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel wrap up its 24th biennium, putting the final changes in place for the 2017-2018 ICAO Technical Instructions and tackling the very difficult subject of whether or not a prohibition on lithium batteries

Lithium battery packaging strives to reduce fire risks

“Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well.”  King Lear – William Shakespeare Or to put it in the modern vernacular, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.”  This is the aphorism that came to mind during my presentation of a new and novel Labelmaster packaging solution at a mini-symposium of lithium battery packaging

Infographic 2015 Regulations in Review

Infographic | 2015 Regulations in Review

Emergency orders and advisories? Check. Airlines making their own rules? Check. Congress playing politics with key deadlines? No surprise to anyone who’s worked in the world of DG shipping regulations for more than 15 minutes. We know there’s only one constant—change.     Download a printable PDF of the Infographic | 2015 Regulations in Review

Lufthansa becomes the latest airline to restrict lithium battery transport—and the strictest.

Ban lithium batteries from airlines? Pursue the violators instead.

On August 12, 2015, a handling agent at London’s Heathrow Airport saw smoke emanating from a pallet that had arrived from Hong Kong. He removed the smoking box and discovered that a lithium battery packed inside—with more than 500 others—had caught fire. The ensuing investigation revealed that: It was unlikely that the shipment’s battery type

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