International Regulations articles

IATA DGR Update: Everything you know about lithium battery shipping may change

Shippers are still coming to grips with the recent International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) addendum, which among other changes, established the first-ever state-of-charge limitation on air transport of lithium batteries. Then, on Saturday, January 16th, the International Air transport Association (IATA) released an addendum to 57th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations, commonly referred to as

ICAO imposes first-ever charge limit on lithium battery shipments, effective April 1

ICAO has published its much anticipated addendum highlighting additional consignment conditions  for the transport of lithium batteries. The ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel considered that these would significantly improve the already high-level of safety of these shipments and it would be prudent to have them in place as soon as possible. As a result, the ICAO addendum

New Year, New Revisions to DG Regulations for IATA and IMO

As often occurs at the turn of the year, both the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) have released updates to their respective Dangerous Goods Regulations.  In the case of the IATA regulations, much of it has to do with revisions to rules surrounding lithium batteries.  Please see our relevant

DG Digest: ICAO’s Lithium Battery Changes Coming to The Technical Instructions

  Long-time observers of the various UN dangerous goods organizations could be forgiven for double checking their calendars in November, as the ICAO Secretariat issued the final report of the 25th meeting of the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel (DGP) less than 3 weeks after the conclusion of the meeting. The reason for this surprising and

ICAO proposing even more changes to lithium battery rules for air shipment

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) held its semi-annual meeting in Montreal, Canada earlier this month. Among many issues discussed there were further changes that may affect shippers and carriers of lithium batteries. This commodity has been under the spotlight for several years now on account of the sometimes-volatile transport incidents that have come to

The Latest Developments in International DG Regulations

It’s been an incredibly busy last six weeks in the realm of international regulatory development. The beginning of November saw the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel wrap up its 24th biennium, putting the final changes in place for the 2017-2018 ICAO Technical Instructions and tackling the very difficult subject of whether or not a prohibition on lithium batteries

New OSHA Letter of Interpretation clarifies Import/Export issues under the HCS

On November 23rd, 2015 the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) released a Letter of Interpretation (LOI) which offered further clarification of US companies’ responsibilities when importing or exporting materials which require action under the 29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard Communication Standard (HCS).  This standard was revised in 2012 to harmonize it with the UN Globally

Guest Blog: Workplace and transport labeling: Communication cures the confusion

Guest blogger Chandra Deeds Gioiello helps clients across the globe navigate regulations with Industrial Health & Safety Consultants, Inc. She is a registered Safety Data Sheet and Label Author and a Certified Industrial Hygienist, specializing in international hazard communication regulations.  I have written Safety Data Sheets for employers throughout the world. I’ve classified mixtures according

Lithium battery packaging strives to reduce fire risks

“Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well.”  King Lear – William Shakespeare Or to put it in the modern vernacular, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.”  This is the aphorism that came to mind during my presentation of a new and novel Labelmaster packaging solution at a mini-symposium of lithium battery packaging

D.O.T. moves to ban e-Cigs in checked bags

On October 26, 2015, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issued an interim final rule banning passengers and crew from storing electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other battery-powered electronic smoking devices in checked bags on passenger airlines.  This final ruling will be effective seven days after the upcoming posting

Top