Training articles

Dangerous Goods competency assessments: A level beyond training

Dangerous Goods competency assessments: A level beyond training

Should people who handle Dangerous Goods be as competent at their jobs as doctors are at theirs? Philip Mondor thinks so. “Doctors, nurses and lawyers are subject to rigorous competency assessments based on robust science. We’re seeing an emergence of similar practices in occupational areas that have regulated aspects, like logistics.” Mondor is the president

Do you need the industry’s most complete IATA online training course?

There are hazmat regulations, and then there are hazmat air transport regulations. However complex and burdensome you might find the regulations for transport of any given material by road, rail or vessel, you can bet the regulations for shipping that same material by air are tougher to comply with. The reason for the disparity is

2018 Dangerous Goods Symposium speaker LaQuita Donald on training millennials.

LaQuita Donald, CHMM, CDGP, the Environmental & Hazmat Compliance Manager at Motion Industries, Inc., will speak about “Training Millennials” during the 13th annual Dangerous Goods Symposium, September 5–7, 2018, in Rosemont, Illinois. You may never talk with anyone who’s more enthusiastic about her role in the Dangerous Goods industry than LaQuita Donald. Yet she’s concerned

Besides hazmat employees, who else should get hazmat training?

Every organization handling Dangerous Goods knows (or ought to know) that employees meeting the definition of a “hazmat employee” need to be trained in accordance with 49 CFR, Part 172, Subpart H, unless otherwise excepted. Who’s a hazmat employee? The short version of the definition, from Part 171.8, is: “A person who … directly affects

Two (more) ways to make hazmat training stress-free

Last year, Labelmaster introduced five new online training courses to help Dangerous Goods pros relieve some of the stress of required hazmat training. Stress? What stress? Well, when you manage a shipping operation that handles Dangerous Goods, stress is part of the job description. And keeping hazmat employees compliantly trained and knowledgeable can be a

Remember these disasters? “Dang Good” training made sure they never happened.

This post is adapted from a presentation given at the 2017 Dangerous Goods Symposium by Gene Sanders, founder and manager of W.E. Train Consulting. Since we can abbreviate the words “hazardous materials” to “hazmat,” I say we shorten “Dangerous Goods training” to “Dang Good training.” It saves time, and it describes what we trainers hope

Dangerous Goods Symposium Day 3—Lithium Battery Day

Day 3 of the Dangerous Goods Symposium has, for the last few years, been known as “Lithium Battery Day.” It’s only a half day, but the always-vigorous discussion panel gives the 300 DG pros in attendance a full day’s worth of information to digest. We’ll get to highlights of today’s panel in a minute. But

Dangerous Goods Symposium Day 2—Dang Good Training

“We abbreviate’ hazardous materials’ to ‘hazmat,’” said Gene Sanders, kicking off Day 2 of the 2017 Dangerous Goods Symposium. “I say we shorten ‘Dangerous Goods training’ to ‘Dang Good training.’” Sanders, co-founder of W. E. Train Consulting, gave the 300 DG pros on hand an entertaining look at an assortment of horrific explosions, spills and

Dangerous Goods Symposium Day 1—Why aren’t DG pros more confident?

At 8 a.m. on a clear September day, Chicago’s historic Drake Hotel looks out over Lake Michigan waters still sparkling from the sunrise. But a different sort of outlook drew the focus of the Dangerous Goods professionals assembled for the 12th annual Dangerous Goods Symposium—a view that was far more serious. Day 1 of the

How online hazmat training can lower your blood pressure

When you manage a shipping operation that handles Dangerous Goods, stress is part of the job description. And keeping hazmat employees compliantly trained can be a major source of that elevated blood pressure. If you’re responsible for hazmat training, you have to: Determine who qualifies as a hazmat employee as defined by 49 CFR (§171.8) Determine

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