International Regulations articles

Why the new lithium battery test summary rules are nothing to stress out about

Why the new lithium battery test summary rules are nothing to stress out about

On January 1, 2020, a new regulation goes into effect that will impact every organization that manufactures or distributes lithium batteries and/or the equipment they power. These companies will be required to share information, known as a “test summary,” that proves their batteries meet the testing standards as defined in sub-section 38.3 of the UN

Shipping hazmat to (or from) China? Here are 5 things you must know

One of the most fascinating presentations at the latest Dangerous Goods Symposium was from Terry Guo, CDGP, DGSA, Regulatory Specialist and China Representative with IHMM. His presentation on “Hazardous Materials Transport Requirements in China” was an excellent primer on a very complex subject. You can download his full presentation here, but we also spoke with

Postal rates may increase if U.S. departs Universal Postal Union

Although it does not have the current traction in the news that many other topics do, a technical arrangement that governs the US Postal Service’s relations to other international postal bodies may leave US-based shippers facing higher fees.  A meeting in Geneva, Switzerland on September 25-26th is more or less the last chance for the

DG Symposium Day 2: A spotlight on advanced hazmat technology

Technology was one of the dominant themes of the 4th annual Dangerous Goods Confidence Outlook, the results of which were revealed during Day 1 of the 2019 Dangerous Goods Symposium. Among the survey’s findings: 55% of companies rely on manual processes, at least in part, for shipping hazmat. 45% called their ability to centrally store

Client ID Database has DG Stakeholders North of the Border Facing a New Registration Requirement

Formal consultation (the equivalent in Canada to the familiar US “Comment period” for proposed rulemakings) has ended in Canada on a new proposal which, according to Transport Canada, will require stakeholders who will: import, offer for transport, handle or transports dangerous goods in Canada To register with Transport Canada under the identification database requirement.  The

Hazmat pros—with HM-215O coming, how do you spell “harmonization?”

Last week we shared transatlantic viewpoints on confidence in Dangerous Goods compliance. This week, our experts talk about harmonization between Europe and North America. The supply chain is more global than it’s ever been. Yet Dangerous Goods regulations still vary from country to country. The differences in hazmat regulations between Europe and North America are—thankfully—nowhere

Why are American hazmat pros less confident? Two experts weigh in.

Remember, back when you were in school, the feeling of walking out of a final exam knowing you absolutely nailed it? That’s how we want Dangerous Goods pros to feel about their operations every day—like they got every last detail right, and that all their outcomes will be positive. Unfortunately, that’s not the reality. Year

10,000 miles, 5 sets of hazmat regulations? Welcome to Latin America

If you work in Dangerous Goods in North America or Europe, you’ve probably complained at one time or another about the complexity of ever-changing hazmat regulations. Diego Gotelli would like you to know that, compared to Dangerous Goods pros in Latin America, you have it easy. Gotelli, director of the Argentinian emergency response agency CIQUIME,

Your fall guide to 2019 Dangerous Goods regulatory publications

Who doesn’t love fall? The trees go ablaze with color, the air takes on that indescribable crispness, and the latest Dangerous Goods regulatory publications become available. (Alternate opening for those in the southern hemisphere: Who doesn’t love spring? The trees burst from grey to green, the air takes on that indescribable lushness, and the latest

Will the updated IMDG Code help prevent another maritime DG disaster?

A common frustration of working in the Dangerous Goods supply chain is “keeping up with constantly changing regulations.” Why do the rules change so often? One reason regulations change? It’s to prevent incidents like the devastating 2012 explosion aboard the container ship MSC Flaminia, in which three crew members were killed. Earlier this month, the

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