DG Digest: PHMSA Seeks Comments on Radioactive Material, EPA Focusing on Reverse Logistics, and IATA Releases Changes to the 58th Edition of the DGR

US regulatory agencies PHMSA and OSHA have released brand new guidance helping to explain the correct labeling options available for users of bulk containers. Such guidance includes steps for operators of rail cars, like the oil carrying tank cars seen in this BNSF unit train northbound at Auburn, Washington on September 18th, 2016. Image © 9/2016 by Nikki Burgess; all rights reserved.

US regulatory agencies PHMSA and OSHA have released brand new guidance helping to explain the correct labeling options available for users of bulk containers. Such guidance includes steps for operators of rail cars, like the oil carrying tank cars seen in this BNSF unit train northbound at Auburn, Washington on September 18th, 2016. Image © 9/2016 by Nikki Burgess; all rights reserved.

With Mid-September already here, the fall football season is not the only kick-off freshly in the news; regulatory matters also continue in play, with the associated agencies busy with their respective agendas.  Let’s take a look at what’s new:

PHMSA

  • In harmonization news, PHMSA seeks public comment on a draft revision of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) ‘‘Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material’’ (SSR–6), which is scheduled for publication in 2018. PHMSA and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will submit comments jointly to the IAEA regarding the draft document. PHMSA thereby requests public input to assist in U.S. comment development on or before October 28, 2016.  Here’s your path to comment
  • PHMSA and OSHA have worked together to help make the process of harmonizing transport and workplace hazard communication easier for US shippers.  The latest such effort is represented by new guidance help to delineate the correct requirements for and methods to apply correct labeling, placarding, etc to bulk containers—things like big portable tanks, tank vehicles, and even various rail cars.  Some situations where such containers can be used for both shipping and as workplace storage and use containers can be confusing, and the new guidance is intended to try to help clear things up.  The new guidance also is harmonized with current international requirements.  See the document here

EPA

EPA announced a new focus on the hazardous waste implications that may be involved in returned retail products at consumer level.  This ties in to PHMSA’s recent push to ensure the safe transport of such consumer commodities at retailers.  Previous to these efforts, once hazmat got to the retail level, to a certain degree it “fell off the radar” and so these new initiatives from multiple agencies show that the regulatory structure is intent on getting a better grasp on the issue.  See EPA’s take on things here

Transport Canada

If you ship non-bulk to or from Canada, you’ll want to review the proposed new guidance that Transport Canada has published regarding small containers.  See the link below to access the proposal and to follow the pathway for questions and comments

Air Regulations

The airline industry association IATA has released the summary of planned 2017 Changes to its Dangerous Goods Regulations (IATA DGR).  The update will bring the manual into congruence with the most current rules found in the ICAO regulations—the rules published by the UN sanctioned body that helps ensure safety of flight worldwide.  See the summary here

OSHA/Health Canada

OSHA and Canadian sister agency Health Canada have published new joint guidance promulgated by the US/Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council.  The new work furthers harmonization of the ongoing GHS implantation into the workplace requirements (US HCS/Canadian WHMIS) of both nations.  See the new guidance here

Note:  Also please see OSHA’s joint guidance effort with PHMSA regarding bulk containers, located in the PHMSA section.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 recall

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last ten days, you can hardly have missed the current flap surrounding the recall of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 mobile device account alleged fire and explosion concerns related to its battery.   On September 15th the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a formal recall notice, which will affect more than one million such devices.  The FAA and Transport Canada have also banned the devices from use or recharging during flight, as well as from any checked baggage.


Labelmaster is a full service provider of products and services for the Hazardous Materials and Dangerous Goods professional, shippers, transport operators, and EH&S providers. See our full line of solutions at www.labelmaster.com.

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