Tag Archives: Labels

Required Regulatory Change Affects Marking Text Size for Hazard Class Labels

Both the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and International Maritime Organization (IMO) recently changed the required size of the text to be used when marking the United Nations Identification Number (UNID Number) on packages of dangerous goods/hazardous materials.  The UNID Number is a four-digit numerical designator (for example, UN1993) which provides an internationally recognized identification number

PHMSA Responds to Recent Rule Appeals, Proposes to Extend ORM-D System Phase-Out Until End of 2015

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Administration (PHMSA) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the U.S. Federal Register today addressing appeals that resulted from recent harmonization rules HM-215K and HM-231, both of which dealt with hazmat packaging requirements. Companies should examine the NPRM carefully and work with their respective trade organizations to ensure that

New Minimum Size Requirements for Hazmat Package Markings Expected to Take Effect in 2013

Hazmat shippers will want to take note of new UN recommendations regarding minimum dimension requirements for package markings that could have an effect as soon as next year. The 17th edition of the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods – Model Regulations requires that the UN number marked on packagings must meet minimum

OSHA to Publish GHS Final Rule, Revise Hazcom Standard

In an effort to “improve the quality and consistency of hazard information, making it safer for workers to do their jobs and easier for employers to stay competitive,” the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has revised its Hazard Communication Standard to align it with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals,

Review of OSHA’s GHS Final Rule Concluded

UPDATE (2/23): The Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs concluded the review of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s revised hazard communication standard on Feb. 21, 2012. The rule was returned to OSHA with a “consistent with change” notice, meaning OIRA did make modifications to the proposed rule. OSHA will

OSHA GHS Implementation Advances to OMB

After a few weeks of delays, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) submitted its revised hazard communication standard, which implements the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), to the Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for final review on Oct. 25. The OIRA

OSHA GHS Implementation Remains in Regulatory Limbo

September has come and gone without the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) unveiling its revised Hazard Communication Standard. As mentioned in our previous post, OSHA is in the final stages of a rule-making process that will modify the current hazard communication standard to incorporate elements of the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling

Recent Changes to US Hazard Communication Requirements for Labels, Placards and IBCs

On July 20, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published final rule HM-218F, which adopted various amendments to the U.S. Hazardous Materials Regulations in order to update and clarify certain regulatory requirements. By implementing these amendments, PHMSA hopes to: promote safer transportation practices; eliminate unnecessary regulatory requirements; finalize outstanding petitions for rulemaking; facilitate

An Overview of the New U.S. Requirements for Shipping Limited Quantities of Dangerous Goods

On January 19, 2011, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published final rule HM-215K, which harmonized the requirements of the U.S. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) with international transport regulations.  Among the most significant changes in the rule involved the introduction of the internationally harmonized requirements for shipping limited quantities of dangerous goods (hazardous

OSHA’s Implementation of the GHS Expected Soon

As soon as late August or early September, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) expects to publish a long-awaited final rule that modifies the current hazard communication standard to incorporate elements of the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, also known as the GHS. The GHS was developed in 1992 to standardize

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