Tag Archives: 49 CFR

Getting You Ready — New Lithium Battery Marks and Labels are Mandatory on January 1st

Getting You Ready — New Lithium Battery Marks and Labels are Mandatory on January 1st

As 2019 quickly approaches, lithium battery shippers need to be aware of the mandatory label changes that become effective on January 1st. For almost 2 years shippers of small (excepted) batteries and battery-powered devices have had the option to use either the lithium battery handling “Caution” label or the lithium battery mark while operating under

Your fall guide to 2019 Dangerous Goods regulatory publications

Who doesn’t love fall? The trees go ablaze with color, the air takes on that indescribable crispness, and the latest Dangerous Goods regulatory publications become available. (Alternate opening for those in the southern hemisphere: Who doesn’t love spring? The trees burst from grey to green, the air takes on that indescribable lushness, and the latest

What are Materials of Trade, and why should you care?

In last week’s post about non-hazmat employees who should receive hazmat training, Labelmaster Director of Global Learning Rhonda Jessop recommended 49 CFR training for employees who transport “Materials of Trade,” which she defined as: “… specific amounts of regulated substances that are transported for use on the job, such as painters carrying commercial-sized containers of

Besides hazmat employees, who else should get hazmat training?

Every organization handling Dangerous Goods knows (or ought to know) that employees meeting the definition of a “hazmat employee” need to be trained in accordance with 49 CFR, Part 172, Subpart H, unless otherwise excepted. Who’s a hazmat employee? The short version of the definition, from Part 171.8, is: “A person who … directly affects

Hey hazmat pros—what’s #1 on your 2018 Dangerous Goods wish list?

Back in 2016, if you’d asked people who ship lithium batteries and battery-powered devices what they wished for in 2017, they might have said “We wish there was a simple cardboard box that contained lithium battery fires without gels, pellets or heavy liners. Then we might be able to compliantly ship our products via commercial

DG Symposium speaker Brian Beetz gets shippers’ toughest questions

Brian Beetz, Labelmaster’s Manager of Regulatory Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, will speak about recent updates to the 49 CFR during the 12th annual Dangerous Goods Symposium, September 6–8, 2017, in Chicago. Brian Beetz fulfills a role for Labelmaster that Labelmaster fulfills for its thousands of customers—making sure our products are compliant with the latest regulations and

DG Digest: PHMSA Seeks Input for U.N. Geneva Meeting and USPS Revises Lithium Battery Rules

The end of July finds the Federal Register having roared back to life after a period of relative quiet; most of the action revolves around information requests versus rulemaking, but still, given how slow things have been in the US regulatory world, the activity is significant.  See all the action below. PHMSA The nation’s DG

Dangerous Goods Report Vol. 7

Dangerous Goods Report | Vol. 7

Summary: HM-215: Are you ready for the border patrol? If you ship Dangerous Goods, don’t let new border measurement regulations for labels and placards catch you unprepared. Ship damaged batteries in a fiberboard box? Yes, you can! Just in time for the largest cell phone recall ever—new Special Permit Packaging makes reverse logistics easier and

DG Digest: Lloyd’s of London Reports on Maritime Cargo Incidents, PHMSA to Align with International Regs, and RSC’s Next Meeting Announced

Perhaps understandably given that it’s the last week of the summer season as traditionally end-bracketed by the upcoming Labor Day holiday, this edition of the DG Digest is a bit threadbare in terms of its scope of fresh news this morning.  Nevertheless, here we go: Maritime The US Coast Guard published a notice correcting an

Okay, Fine! PHMSA to Increase Penalties on August 1st

The USDOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) took a big step forward yesterday in upping the ante for shippers who knowingly violate the regulation contained in the US 49 CFR Parts 100 – 185 Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR).  Increases in penalties had been bandied about the industry for some time, and have now

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