Tag Archives: IATA

A Letter from Bangkok on the 109th Meeting of the IATA Dangerous Goods Board

A Letter from Bangkok on the 109th Meeting of the IATA Dangerous Goods Board

  A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for.  – John A. Shedd (Salt from My Attic, 1928) A not so old adage that captures the balance between safety and action.  A 21st century version might be “An airplane is safe in its hangar, but that’s not what

Infographic | New IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations for 2017

Infographic | New IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations for 2017

Year after year, no transport mode sees more Dangerous Goods regulatory changes than air transport. That’s why it’s essential to have a complete grasp of each year’s changes as soon as possible—and why now is the time to order your copy of the 58th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. Here’s a preview of

DG Digest: FedEx LiBat Changes, Samsung Recall Woes Grow, and EPA Settles with Major Grocery Chain

We begin the last week of September and the first full week of the autumn season with interesting news on the ever changing Lithium Battery front as well as activity by both the FRA and EPA on several fronts.  Let’s get right to it:  IATA/FedEx Lithium Battery Changes With big changes already planned (again) for

DG Symposium Day 2—live observations from LabelmasterFest!

This post comes to you fresh from the terrace of the stunning Loews Chicago Hotel. It’s LabelmasterFest, where more than 200 of the world’s foremost Dangerous Goods practitioners are enjoying a gorgeous evening with dinner, drinks and interactive, DG-related games. Way back this morning, Labelmaster VP of Marketing Rob Finn kicked the day off with fun facts

Lithium battery enforcement: We need a level playing field before new restrictions

Lithium battery enforcement: A level playing field will boost safety immediately

Neil McCulloch contributed to this article.  Monday’s press release from IATA, highlighting the problems and implications of non-enforcement of existing lithium battery shipping regulations, is both salutary and discouraging. Salutary, because we’ve long been on record as saying that comprehensive enforcement of existing regulations would have a larger impact on safety than enacting new regulations. Many other

Changes to 58th Edition of the IATA DGR – A Synopsis

In late July, the International Aviation Transport Association (IATA) released a summary document in reference to the changes that will appear in the 58th edition of their Dangerous Goods Regulations (IATA DGR). This edition will become effective on January 1st, 2017.  While many changes are of a minor or administrative nature, a number of significant

Brexit

How will Brexit affect Dangerous Goods transport for the UK and Europe?

Like several of my Labelmaster colleagues, I’m an accredited DGSA, from DGAC’s SQA affiliated training program (No one can say Dangerous Goods is short of acronyms!) and hence well versed in the ADR. What those acronyms mean is that I’m somewhat knowledgeable about European Dangerous Goods regulations as they are applied in Great Britain. As

Living the DG Life

New video explores Dangerous Goods compliance at 30,000 feet

Mike Wentz is Manager of Cargo Compliance for American Airlines, but when he talks about his job he could be speaking for any Dangerous Goods professional in any capacity: “I knew I’d never be comfortable in the role unless I could understand the regulations back to front and be able to communicate them effectively.” Get

19th Edition of UN Model Regulations Foretells Changes to the 58th IATA DGR

2017 will bring in a new edition of the ICAO Technical Instructions which sees ICAO’s biennial catch up with the UN Model Regulations; this time to reflect the 19th revised edition. In consequence, IATA also plays catch up with updating and upgrading their DGR manual to parallel the new edition of the TI. Usually this

FAA Reauthorization Legislation Focused on Lithium Batteries

Bob Richard and Neil McCulloch co-contributed to this article.  When a US Senator proposes to spend tax dollars on a committee to “promote research and new standards for the safe manufacture, use or transportation of lithium batteries,” I can only sigh in frustration. This is exactly what was recently proposed by Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.. 

Top